Argonne National Laboratory Nuclear Engineering Division

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Awards

2007 R&D 100 awards


 
  • R&D 100 AwardsAwardees: Sami Gopalsami, Sasan Bakhtiari, Paul Raptis and Thomas Elmer
    Sensors, Detectors & Diagnostics Department
    Project description: Passive millimeter-wave spectroscopy (PmmWS)
    Project Application: detects chemical plumes at great distances and may help thwart future chemical or nuclear-based terrorist attacks.

The "Passive millimeter-wave spectroscopy (PmmWS)" project by Sami Gopalsami, Sasan Bakhtiari, Paul Raptis and Thomas Elmer, is one of the three Argonne projects which made into the list of the world's 100 most technologically significant products introduced into the marketplace during 2006, as judged by R&D Magazine.

The new award-winning innovation developed at the Department of Energy"s Argonne National Laboratory (Nuclear Engineering Division) can covertly detect chemical plumes at great distances and may help thwart future chemical or nuclear-based terrorist attacks. The technology has a number of other uses, as well, from detecting environmental pollution to determining the extent of tissue damage in burn victims without physical contact.

Passive millimeter-wave spectroscopy (PmmWS), pioneered by NE scientists Sami Gopalsami, Sasan Bakhtiari, Paul Raptis and Thomas Elmer, has the capacity to identify chemical plumes at ranges of up to a few kilometers and at concentrations as low as 100-1000 ppm. This new technology was recently recognized with one of the 2007 R&D 100 awards, colloquially known as the “Oscars of invention.”

The NE team designed PmmWS primarily to monitor chemical signatures emitted by processing facilities suspected of unauthorized nuclear activity. Certain chemical fingerprints can identify factories involved in the enrichment and reprocessing of nuclear materials and their use in weapons production.

The researchers" ability to collect remote data passively, like using an infrared camera, as opposed to actively, like using radar, provides a significant improvement over other chemical detection equipment. “The main concern is that there should be nothing to intercept,” said Gopalsami. “If you are my adversary, you can just put up some sort of receiver and see that I"m looking at you.”

“That was the number one requirement - you do not want to be transmitting any signal,” Bakhtiari added.

This new detection technology possesses several other advantages over other forms of chemical sensing. Previous remote sensing instruments for terrestrial, as opposed to astronomical, use had lower ranges of detection (ranging from 10 m to 100 m), were susceptible to interference from clouds and other atmospheric phenomena, and cost significantly more than PmmWS. Compared to it predecessors, the Argonne system is also safer and offers better selectivity - that is, it can identify a particular molecule instead of just a molecular functional group.

This passive remote-sensing spectrometer represents the second R&D 100 award-winning invention in millimeter-wave technology for the Gopalsami-led team. In 1996, the magazine recognized Gopalsami, Bakhtiari and Raptis for a millimeter-wave imager that could detect flaws in fabric during weaving. The design of that instrument provided part of the basis for their new product.

Adapted from Fact Sheet by Jared Sagoff

NE scientists Sami Gopalsami (left), Thomas Elmer, Paul Raptis and Sasan BakhtiariPioneered by NE scientists Sami Gopalsami (left), Thomas Elmer, Paul Raptis and Sasan Bakhtiari, passive millimeter-wave spectroscopy can identify chemical plumes at ranges of up to a few kilometers and at concentrations as low as 100-1000 ppm.
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Multimedia

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  • Passive millimeter-wave spectroscopy detection of nitric oxide (NO) plumePassive Millimeter-Wave Spectrometer for Remote Chemical Detection
    Video demonstration of passive millimeter-wave spectroscopy.
    [ View this video, Windows Media, 00:02:26 ]

    Other versions of this video are available.
  • Sami GopalsamiGopalsami on WDBC radio
    Sami Gopalsami was interviewed on WDCB radio about passive millimeter-wave spectroscopy.
    [ Listen to the morning Broadcast 00:07:19 (7.1MB, WMA format) ]
    [ Listen to the evening Broadcast 00:08:39 (8.4MB, WMA format) ]

Last Modified: Thu, June 7, 2012 3:21 PM

CNN reports on PmmWS

CNN reports on Passive millimeter-wave spectroscopy (PmmWS) Preventing the worst -
CNN's "Situation Room" focused on Argonne technologies with anti-terrorism applications. Passive millimeter-wave spectroscopy is one of the technologies featured in the report.

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For more information:

Nachappa "Sami" Gopalsami
Detection & Diagnostic Systems Dept
Sensors & Instrumentation Section
Fax:  +1 630-252-3250

Argonne Experts Argonne Experts: N. Gopalsami

Argonne Experts

Dr. Sami Gopalsami is one of the Experts featured in the Argonne Experts Guide.

 

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