• WELCOME
    to the Nuclear Energy Discovery Center
      ROGER TILBROOK, CURATOR
    TRIGA REACTOR PULSE
    Courtesy NETL, UT Austin
  • Since the dawn of the nuclear era
    ARGONNE HAS DEVELOPED THE TECHNOLOGIES THAT FORM THE
    BASIS FOR NEARLY EVERY NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR IN USE
    WORLDWIDE, INCLUDING ADVANCED REACTORS YET TO COME
  • Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) was the
    world's first nuclear reactor
    BUILT BY ENRICO FERMI AND HIS TEAM
    IN 1942 AT THE UNIVERITY OF CHICAGO
    It signaled the birth of a new era..
    ..and the start of our Laboratory
  • Within a decade of Fermi's first reactor, Argonne
    designed, built and tested numerous reactor proto-
    types, including thermal and fast breeder reactors..
    Argonne even developed the reactor
    core for the U.S.S. Nautilus, the world's
    first atomic-powered submarine!
    Argonne's work is the basis for nearly all commercial
    nuclear power reactors used around the world, including
    evolving systems for future sustainable nuclear energy
    ARGONNE "SITE A" CIRCA 1946
  • Today, Argonne works on a broad range of some
    of the nation's most pressing challenges in science,
    energy, environment, and national security
    Fermi's legacy continues today as part of the
    mission of Argonne's Nuclear Engineering division,
    whose work continues to advance the science and
    technology foundations for nuclear energy
  • Evidence of energy usage on
    earth can be discerned from space
    by the glow of urban areas
    Energy demand on our planet will likely double by 2040
    Nuclear power already reliably contributes
    a significant portion of world electric
    power needs without emitting carbon
    17% OF WORLD DEMAND
    20% OF U.S. ELECTRICITY
    (but 70% of U.S. carbon-free electricity)
    HALF OF ILLINOIS' DEMAND
    (Illinois is the top U.S. producer)
    Nuclear power will be needed to
    help meet the growing energy demand
    and combat climate change
    NUCLEAR ENERGY IS THE ONLY CARBON-FREE SOURCE THAT
    OFFERS RELIABLE, LARGE-SCALE, 24/7 AVAILABILITY
  • ARGONNE'S VISION FOR NUCLEAR ENERGY


    The realization of sustainable nuclear energy
    as a safe, secure, carbon-free energy source to
    support global economic growth and prosperity
    GOALS TO ACHIEVE OUR VISION



    Lead development of advanced reactor and fuel cycle
    technologies for safe, secure, sustainable nuclear energy
    Support safe operation & lifetime extension of existing nuclear
    power plants, and safe management and disposition of used fuel
    Advance U.S. nonproliferation and nuclear materials security goals
  • In addition to strong technical expertise, we have unique infrastructure for
    nuclear energy R&D, including world-class science facilities like the Advanced
    Photon Source and Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, and facilities for
    testing and validation of reactor concepts and components
  • Research & Test Reactors
    Argonne has a distinguished history of
    advancing our nation's nonproliferation goals
    This includes our long-standing work to convert
    research and test reactors worldwide to use low-
    rather than high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel
    TRIGA POOL-TYPE RESEARCH REACTOR
    Argonne's reactor expertise enables our engineers to
    come up with designs that eliminate the need for HEU,
    yet preserve all facility mission requirements
    70 facilities have been converted in
    38 countries since we started in 1978
    RESULTING IN SUBSTANTIAL REDUCTION OF HEU USAGE WORLDWIDE
    AND THE ASSOCIATED RISK OF THE SPREAD OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS
  • Computing
    Argonne has used computers for much of its history. This was the Lab's first computer, AVIDAC (1953).
    We pioneered the use of simulation
    and modeling for reactor research
    Our software has become
    a standard for use worldwide
    Today, much of our computing
    can be performed on our powerful
    linux clusters, like this one..
    We also use the world's most
    powerful supercomputers, such as
    MIRA, at Argonne's Leadership
    Computing Facility
  • Simulation
    This is an example of a complex simulation requiring
    a powerful supercomputer. It models coolant flow
    in a sodium-cooled fast reactor.
    The distorted (eddy current) flow along the
    side is due to the helical wire-wrapped fuel
    pins used to space the fuel and promote
    mixing to reduce hot spots
    It used a billion grid points and ran on
    65536 computer processors!
WELCOME
DAWN OF NUCLEAR ERA
FUTURE OF NUCLEAR
ARGONNE'S VISION