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Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1)


Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy


Argonne Energy Showcase 2012

Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

Atoms forge a Scientific Revolution

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Einstein's Letter

This letter from Albert Einstein to President Franklin D. Roosevelt led to the Manhattan Engineering District, also known as "the Manhattan Project," a national crash program racing to develop atomic weapons before Nazi Germany. The Manhattan Project was the seed that grew into the modern national laboratory system, which today includes many non-weapons-research laboratories, such as Argonne.

Einstein's letter (part 1)

 

Einstein's letter (part 2)

 

Next: Piglet and the Pumpkin Field

Celebrating Chicago Pile 1 70th anniversary

Related Information


Multimedia

  • CP-1 Flickr Gallery (by Argonne National Laboratory)
  • Argonne nuclear pioneers: Chicago Pile 1 on YouTube (by Argonne National Laboratory) On December 2, 1942, 49 scientists, led by Enrico Fermi, made history when Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) went critical and produced the world's first self-sustaining, controlled nuclear chain reaction. Seventy years later, two of the last surviving CP-1 pioneers, Harold Agnew and Warren Nyer, recall that historic day.

Last Modified: Wed, September 25, 2013 9:08 PM

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